Home:: Colleges in Tennessee that have closed, merged, or changed their names

Colleges in Tennessee that have closed, merged, or changed their names

College Name City State Start Date End Date Affiliation Other Information Source
American Temperance University Harriman Tennessee 1893


http://www.crl.edu/content.asp?l1=5&l2=22&l3=39&top=10
Cummins, D. Duane.  The Disciples Colleges: A History.  1987.
Andrew College Trenton Tennessee


property purchased in 1875 for use as public school
Andrew Jackson Business College
Tennessee




Austin Peay State College Clarksville Tennessee 1927
state supported founded as two-year junior college and teacher training institution on grounds of the former Southwestern Presbyterian University; authorized to offer baccalaureate degrees after 1939; name changed to Austin Peay State College in 1943 and to Austin Peay State University in 1967 http://www.apsu.edu/General/history.aspx
Athens Female College Athens Tennessee 1857
Methodist Episcopal Church South in 1866 became East Tennessee Wesleyan College; in 1886 became Grant Memorial University and in 1906, U.S. Grant University in 1889, the Athens School of the University of Chattanooga; became independent of University of Chattanooga in 1925 as Tennessee Wesleyan College www.twcnet.edu/Academics/history.html
Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.
Baptist Female College Dancyville Tennessee 1855


http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~haywood/history.htm
Bellevue Female College Collierville Tennessee 1899

Cummins uses 1899 for founding, though may've operated as early as 1870; in 1905 consolidated with Collierville Male Academy as Collierville High School Cummins, D. Duane.  The Disciples Colleges: A History.  1987.
www.scs.k12.tn.us/SCS/high/Collierville/info/history.htm
Belmont Junior College Nashville Tennessee 1890 1913
merged with Ward Seminary to become Ward-Belmont http://www.belmont.edu/hr/look.html
Bethel College McLemoresville Tennessee 1842
Cumberland Presbyterian founded by the West Tennessee Synod of the Cumberland Presbyterian
Church; granted a charter by the State of Tennessee in 1847; moved to McKenzie, TN in 1872; name change to Bethel University, August 2009
http://www.bethelu.edu/
Bledsoe College
Tennessee



www.segenealogy.com/tennessee/tn_county/ble.htm
Blount College Knoxville Tennessee 1794

grant of public lands received from state in 1807 and name changed to East Tennessee College; closed in 1809 for a decade, reopening in 1820 http://web.utk.edu/~mklein/brfhist.html
Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories.  2003.
Bluff Springs Academy Gibson County Tennessee


may've granted bachelors degrees; John E. Wright, attended and graduated in 1858, his father, Levi Wright, served as Supt. of Schools in the county; the elder Wright was a founder of Wake Forest College in North Carolina http://www.rootsweb.com/~tndyer/family/diploma.html
Goodspeeds History of Tennessee, 1887
Bolton College & Agricultural High School Brunswick Tennessee



http://www.crl.edu/collcat/collcatB.htm
Boscobel College Nashville Tennessee




Botanico-Medical College Memphis Tennessee 1846 1861
name changed in 1859 to Eclectic Medical Institute of Memphis Haller, John. Kindly Medicine: Physio-Medicalism in America 1836-1911. 1997.
Branell College Nashville Tennessee



www.ed-oha.org/cases/1994-210-sa.html
Bristol University Bristol Tennessee 1895 1994


Brownsville Baptist Female College Brownsville Tennessee 1851
Baptist chartered as West Tennessee Baptist Female College http://www.mtsu.edu/~library/wtn/colleges/brownsville.html
Blandin.  History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Bryson College Fayetteville Tennessee 1919 1929 Associated Reformed Presbyterian
www.erskine.edu/news/sandlapper.6.8.01.html
Buford College Nashville Tennessee 1905 c. 1920
women's college in Glendale section www.geocities.com/Heartland/Acres/6038/Buford_College.html
Burritt College Spencer Tennessee 1848 1938 Churches of Christ (Disciples) led by William David Carnes until 1857; suspended operations for a time beginning in 1860; Carnes served again as president from 1872-1878 www.state.tn.us/sos/statelib/pubus/bibvanbu.htm
Cummins, D. Duane.  The Disciples Colleges: A History.  1987
www.therestorationmovement.com/carnes,wd.htm
Caledonia College Caledonia Tennessee


Edwin H. Randle, founding president; closed and burned during the Civil War; considered predecessor for McKenzie College
Carson College Jefferson City Tennessee 1880

successor of Mossy Creek Baptist College that was founded as Mossy Creek Baptist Seminary in 1851; name changed to Carson College in 1880; merged with Newman College for Women in 1889 to become Carson-Newman College http://www.cn.edu/site/NS_subsites/TheCollege/cnh_History.htm
Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories.  2003.
Centenary College Cleveland Tennessee


property purchased by Bob Jones in 1933 and relocated a school from Saint Andrews Bay, FL (founded in 1926); in 1947 moved to Greenville, SC to become Bob Jones University  http://www.crl.edu/content.asp?l1=5&l2=22&l3=39&top=10
Ringenberg, William C.  The Christian College: A History of Protestant Higher Education in America. 1984.
Central Tennessee College Nashville Tennessee 1867 1900 Freedmen's Aid Society of Methodist Episcopal Church founded as school for freedmen; Meharry Medical deparment opened in 1875, a law department in 1879, and dental and pharmaceutical departments were opened in 1880; name changed to Walden University http://docsouth.unc.edu/church/haley/menu.html
Ringenberg, William C.  The Christian College: A History of Protestant Higher Education in America. 1984.
Central University Nashville Tennessee 1872
Methodist Episcopal Church, South adopted name of Vanderbilt University in 1873;Cornelius Vanderbilt and his wife contributed $1 million and other family members contributed another $10 million by 1895; nonsectarian after 1914 Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.
Ringenberg, William C. 
The Christian College: A History of Protestant Higher Education in America. 1984.
Chattanooga State Technical Community College Chattanooga Tennessee 1965
state supported founded as Chattanooga State Technical Institute; name change to Chattanooga State Technical Community College in 1973; name change to Chattanooga State Community College in 2009 http://www.chattanoogastate.edu/about/abhis.asp
Chattanooga University Chattanooga Tennessee 1886
Methodist Episcopal became Grant University in 1889, University of Chattanooga in 1907, independent of church in 1909, merged with University of Tennessee and Chattanooga City College in 1969, now the University of Tennessee-Chattanooga Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.
Clarksville Female Academy Clarksville Tennessee 1846
Methodist Episcopal Church South offered a collegiate program and post-graduate courses Blandin.  The History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Clinton College New Middleton Tennessee 1834 1850's
founded by Dr. Francis H. Gordon, James B. Moores and Willie B.
Gordon,  and established in October, 1833, on the Lebanon and
Trousdale Ferry Turnpike.  Dr. F. H. Gordon and Prof. James B.
Moores (the latter of whom became an eminent lawyer) were for
many years the principal teachers in the college, the doors of
which were permanently closed sometime during the decade of the fifties.
http://www.drewa.com/John%20Gord%20&%20Related%20Family%20Documents.htm
College of Physicians and Surgeons Memphis Tennessee
1911
merged with University of Tennessee Medical School http://www.memphislibrary.org/history/memphis2.htm
Columbia Athenaeum Columbia Tennessee 1852


Blandin.  The History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Columbia Institute Columbia Tennessee 1836
Episcopal offered a collegiate program for a time; by 1909 operated as a preparatory school Blandin.  The History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Corona College Lebanon Tennessee



http://www.cumberland.edu/about/history.html
Correspondence Literary College Van   Tennessee 1900


Cummins, D. Duane.  The Disciples Colleges: A History.  1987.
Cumberland College Nashville Tennessee 1785

founded as Davidson Academy, became Cumberland College in 1806, University of Nashville in 1826, State Normal College in 1875, Peabody Normal College in 1889, and George Peabody College for Teachers in 1909 Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.
Cumberland Female College McMinnville Tennessee 1851 1896 Cumberland Presbyterian 5 teachers and 100 students in 1851; forced to close during Civil War; presidents: A.M. Stone (1851-55), J.M. Gill (1855-57), D.M. Donnell (1857-1871), A.M. Burney (1871-1880), N.J. Finney (1880-1896) www.cumberland.org/hfcpc/mcdonold/42-49.htm
www.cumberland.org/hfcpc/schools/CumberlandFemaleCollege.htm
Blandin.  The History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
www.tngennet.org/warren/gdsp-dex.htm
David Lipscomb College Nashville Tennessee 1891
Churches of Christ founded as Nashville Bible School; name change to David Lipscomb College in 1917, to David Lipscomb University in 1989, and to Lipscomb University in 2005 http://www.lipscomb.edu/
Dick White College Fayetteville Tennessee 1890


www.cumberland.org/hfcpc/schools/Evans.htm
Dixie College Cookesville Tennessee 1910

chartered in 1909 as the University of Dixie, but known as Dixie College; deeded to Cookeville & Putnam Counties in 1915 and operated as Tennessee Polytechnic Institute as a high school and jr. college; offered a 4-yr program after 1929; name changed to Tennessee Technological University in 1965 Cummins, D. Duane.  The Disciples Colleges: A History.  1987.
www.tntech.edu/history.html
Draughon Junior College of Business Kingsport Tennessee
1991


Draughon Junior College of Business Knoxville Tennessee 1884 1991


East Tennessee College Knoxville Tennessee 1809

designated in 1869 as the land-grant institution in the state; in 1879 name changed to University of Tennessee http://web.utk.edu/~mklein/brfhist.html
Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories.  2003.
East Tennessee Wesleyan University Athens Tennessee

Methodist Episcopal Church successor to Athens Female College; predecessor to Grant Memorial University www.twcnet.edu/Academics/history.html
Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories.  2003.
Ewing and Jefferson College Blount County Tennessee 1855


www.cumberland.org/hfcpc/mcdonold/42-49.htm;
www.cumberland.org/hfcpc/schools/Evans.htm
Fairmount College Monteagle Tennessee 1872
Episcopal women's college; closed with advent of WWI; one student was the future Madame Chiang Kai-Shek www.duboseconf.com/history.html
Frank Hughes College Clifton Tennessee



www.rootsweb.com/~tnwayne/clifton/college.htm
Franklin College Franklin Tennessee 1844 1865 Churches of Christ (Disciples) founded by Tolbert Fanning and Bowling Embry; enrolled 150 students in first year; known for adoption of Fellenburg's work-study concept; Cummins states that operations suspended in 1861, reopened briefly in 1865, but permanently closed that year when fire destroyed campus; Hunt & Carper give 1879 as closing date Young, M. Norvel.  A History of Colleges Established and Controlled by Members of the Churches of Christ. 1949. pp. 34-52.
Hunt and Carper, eds. 
Religious Higher Education in the United States.  1996.
Cummins, D. Duane.
The Disciples Colleges: A History.  1987.
Giles College
Tennessee



http://www.tngenweb.org/giles/history/gs.html
Grant Memorial University Chattanooga / Athens Tennessee


successor to East Tennessee Wesleyan University; predecessor to Athens School of the University of Chattanooga www.twcnet.edu/Academics/history.html
Burke, Colin B. American Collegiate Populations. 1982.
Greeneville College Greeneville Tennessee 1794 1868 Presbyterian though proposed in 1794, classes probably started in 1803; suspended classes during Civil War and in aftermath of the war, merged with Tusculum College http://ajmuseum.tusculum.edu/tcarchives.html
www.tngenweb.org/goodspeed/greene/
Greeneville College Greeneville Tennessee

African Methodist Episcopal Zion
http://docsouth.unc.edu/church/harris/harris.html
Hall-Moody Junior College Martin  Tennessee 1900 1927 Baptist consolidated with Union University www.uu.edu/about/
Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories.  2003.
Hanner Highland Male and Female College Vervilla Tennessee 1856


www.tngennet.org/warren/gdsp-dex.htm
Henderson Male and Female College Henderson Tennessee 1869

founded as Henderson Male and Female Institute, became Henderson Masonic Male and Female Institute in 1877, became West Tennessee Christian College in 1885 www.rootsweb.com/~tncheste/goodspeed.shtml
Holston College New Market Tennessee 1840 1845
alma mater of James Henry Randolph, U.S. House of Representatives, 1877-1879 http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=R000045
Holston Synodical College Mosheim Tennessee 1869 1910
successor for Mosheim Institute; named Holston Synodical College for 1897; for two years after 1906, known as Holston College; then, Cowden College until 1910; building purchased for Greene County for high school http://patsabin.com/Mosheim/schoolhist.htm
Howard College Gallatin Tennessee 1837
Odd Fellows
Blandin.  The History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Irving College Warren County Tennessee 1840
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) Goodspeed's history gives 1835 as founding date and states that the school operated until May, 1861, reopening in 1882 Cummins, D. Duane.  The Disciples Colleges: A History.  1987.
www.tngennet.org/warren/gdsp-dex.htm
Jackson College Columbia Tennessee 1830's


Burke, Colin B. American Collegiate Populations. 1982.
http://www.tngenweb.org/maury/gsdf.htm
Johnson Bible College Knoxville Tennessee 1893

founded as the School for Evangelists; name changed to Johnson Bible College in 1909; name changed to Johnson University in 2011 http://www.jbc.edu/our-history.html
Knoxville Medical College Knoxville Tennessee 1900 1910
began operation in 1895 as medical department of Knoxville College
La Grange Female College La Grange Tennessee 1854

first president was David B. Johnson who died soon after institution opened; John D. Meredith was president 1858-1867; closed during the war, reopened and continued operation; building later used as public school and burned in 1921 www.lagrangetn.com/college.htm
La Grange Synodical College La Grange Tennessee b1839
Presbyterian Burke notes Masonic and Presbyterian ties; new brick building in 1855 with John H. Gray, pastor of Beale St. Second Presbyterian Church as president; occupied by Federal troops during Civil War Burke, Colin B. American Collegiate Populations. 1982.
www.lagrangetn.com/college.htm
Lawrence College Alexandria Tennessee 1860
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) Goodspeed's history gives 1858 as founding date Cummins, D. Duane.  The Disciples Colleges: A History.  1987.
www.tngenweb.org/dekalb/gdsphist.htm
Lebanon College for Young Ladies Lebanon Tennessee



www.rootsweb.com/~tnwcogs/docs/goodsp02.html
Lexington Baptist Male and Female College Lexington Tennessee 1895 1903
presidents: E.W. Essary (1895), J.A. Mount, A.J. Barton (1896), Andrew L. Todd (1898), J.L. McNatt (1898), W.R. Phillips (1899-1900), Robert L. Sutton (1901-1903) www.henderson-lea.hc.k12tn.net/donahue/he-stuff/bapt-col.htm
Madison College Spring Creek Tennessee 1850's
Baptist Spring Creek is located in Madison County Burke, Colin B. American Collegiate Populations. 1982.
Madison College Madison Tennessee 1904
7th Day Adventist founded as Nashville Agricultural Normal Institute on a farm of 412 acres; a sanitarium and campus industries were integral to the plan of work and study for students http://personalweb.edge.net/~gbockmon/ms_info/review.html
http://www.nashville.gov/mhc/education.htm
Manchester College Manchester Tennessee 1878
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) biography of W.D. Carnes has him serving as president of Manchester for seven years from 1865-1872 Young, M. Norvel.  A History of Colleges Established and Controlled by Members of the Churches of Christ. 1949.
Cummins, D. Duane. 
The Disciples Colleges: A History.  1987.
www.therestorationmovement.com/carnes,wd.htm
Mary Sharp College Winchester Tennessee 1850 1896 Baptist founded as The Tennessee and Alabama Institute; first U.S. women's college to require both Latin & Greek in a four-year course of study and awarded A.B. degree. Harwarth, Maline, and DeBra.  Women's Colleges in the United States. 
http://www.ed.gov/offices/OERI/PLLI/webreprt.html;
http://www.mtsu.edu/~library/wtn/colleges/msharp.html
Blandin. 
History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Masonic College Macon Tennessee


William Rainey Harper, later president of University of Chicago, served as principal of Masonic College for one year in 1876 http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/spcl/centcat/pres/presch01_01.html
Masonic University of Tennessee Clarksville Tennessee 1848

enjoyed numerous name changes becoming Montgomery Masonic College in 1850, Stewart College in 1855, Southwestern Presbyterian University in 1875; moved to Memphis in 1925 becoming Southwestern at Memphis and in 1984 renamed Rhodes College www.rhodes.edu/Academics/CollegeCatalogue/GeneralInformation/HistoricalSummary/index.cfm
McKenzie College Clarksville Tennessee 1838
Methodist founded as Caledonia College and burned during the Civil War; later moved and name changed with J.W.P. McKenzie serving as president after 1871; 1882 known as McTyire Institute and later after 1899 McTyire School
McKenzie College Chattanooga Tennessee 1940's 1992
Roy E. McKenzie, Jr. was president
Memphis Conference Female Institute Jackson Tennessee 1843 2011 Methodist became coed in 1923 with move to Jackson, TN and changed name to Lambuth College; Lambuth University after 1991; closed 2011; campus acquired by the University of Memphis for a branch campus www.lambuth.edu/aboutlambuth/history.html
www.henderson-lea.hc.k12n.net/donahue/madison/gsmed.htm
Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories.  2003.
http://www.tngenweb.org/goodspeed/madison/#school
Memphis Hospital Medical College Memphis Tennessee 1876 1911
see entry for Nashville Medical College http://www.utmem.edu/history_archives/
Mid-South Bible College Memphis Tennessee 1960

founded as Mid-South Bible Training Center in 1941; name changed to Mid-South Bible Institute in 1948; to Mid-South Bible College in 1960; name changed to Crichton College in 1987; name change in May 2010 to Victory University http://www.victory.edu/about-us/history/
Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories.  2003.
Middle Tennessee State Teachers College Murfreesboro Tennessee 1909
state supported founded as Middle Tennessee State Normal School; name change to Middle Tennessee State Teachers College in 1926, to State Teachers College, Murfreesboro in 1929, to Middle Tennessee State College in 1941, and to Middle Tennessee State University in 1965 Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.
Milton College Fayetteville Tennessee 1856

alma mater of Willa McCord Blake Eslick who served in U.S. House of Representatives http://www.cumberland.org/hfcpc/schools/Evans.htm
http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=E000217
Minerva College Franklin Tennessee 1849
Churches of Christ institution for women; operated as companion institution of Franklin College Young, M. Norvel.  A History of Colleges Established and Controlled by Members of the Churches of Christ. 1949. p. 51.
Montgomery Masonic College Clarksville Tennessee 1848

became Stewart College 1855, Southwestern Presbyterian University in 1875; moved to Memphis in 1925 Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.
Morristown College Morristown Tennessee 1881 1989 United Methodist started by Freedman's Aid Society of Methodist Episcopal Church; two year institution for blacks; acquired by Knoxville College in 1989 and operated for a few years until financial difficulties led to closure of Knoxville College-Morristown in 1994 http://www.mtsu.edu/~library/wtn/colleges/morristown.html
http://www.umc.org/judicial/500/589.html
Mossy Creek Baptist College Jefferson City Tennessee 1851
Baptist founded as Mossy Creek Baptist Seminary; predecessor of Carson-Newman College (after 1889) Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.
http://www.cn.edu/site/NS_subsites/TheCollege/cnh_History.htm
Murphy College Sevierville Tennessee 1892 1936

http://www.crl.edu/collcat/collcatM.htm
Nashville College for Young Ladies Nashville Tennessee


founded by George W. Price who previously had served as president of Huntsville (AL) Female College and later was professor of physiology at Vanderbuilt Medical School http://www.crl.edu/collcat/collcatN.htm
Nashville Medical College Nashville Tennessee 1876 1879
The University of Tennessee, College of Medicine has its roots in Nashville as the Nashville Medical College. That college as organized in 1876, and in 1879 was acquired by the University of Tennessee as its medical department. The Memphis Hospital Medical College was also found in 1876 but, because of the yellow fever epidemic in Memphis, did not actually hold classes until 1880. In 1909 two Nashville schools merged and were operating as the joint Medical department of the University of Nashville and the University of Tennessee. It moved to Memphis in 1911 and merged with the College of Physicians and Surgeons to become the University of Tennessee, College of Medicine...  http://www.utmem.edu/history_archives/
Nashville State Technical Community College Nashville Tennessee 1970

initially founded as Nashville State Technical Institute; in 1984 joined the Tennessee Board of Regents system of state universities and community colleges; in 2002, the Tennessee General Assembly approved an expanded mission to that of comprehensive community college; name change to Nashville State Community College in 2009  http://www.nscc.edu/
National Baptist Seminary & Missionary Training School Nashville Tennessee 1918 1931


National Teachers Normal and Business College Henderson Tennessee

Churches of Christ see West Tennessee Christian College entry Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.
Nelson Merry College Jefferson County Tennessee



http://www.tnhillbillie.net/tn/jefferson/articles/jbmalone.html
Neophogen Male and Female College Gallatin Tennessee 1872
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)
http://www.crl.edu/content.asp?l1=5&l2=22&l3=39&top=10
Cummins, D. Duane.  The Disciples Colleges: A History.  1987.
New Century College Cleveland Tennessee



http://www.crl.edu/content.asp?l1=5&l2=22&l3=39&top=10
Newman College Jefferson City Tennessee


women's college, merged with Carson College to form Carson-Newman http://www.cn.edu/site/NS_subsites/TheCollege/cnh_History.htm
Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories.  2003.
Northeast State Technical Community College Blountville Tennessee 1966
state supported founded as Tri-Cities State Area Vocational-Technical School in 1966 under the governance of the State Board for Vocational Education; name change in 1978 to Tri-Cities State Technical Institute;  became part of the State University and Community College System of Tennessee in 1983; name change to Northeast State Technical Community College in 1990; name change to Northeast State Community College in 2009 http://www.nstcc.cc.tn.us/
Paris College Paris Tennessee


founded by Edwin H. Randle who previously had served as president of Caledonia College
Pellissippi State Technical Community College Knoxville Tennessee 1974
state supported founding as State Technical Institute at Knoxville; Tennessee Board of Regents approved the expansion of the mission to include college transfer programs and name changed to Pellissippi State Technical Community College in 1988; name change to Pellissippi State Community College in 2009 http://www.pstcc.edu/about_pstcc/index.html
People's College Pikeville Tennessee


…eight miles from Pikeville? http://www.rootsweb.com/~gamacon/newspapers/CV/cv1911pg11.htm
www.segenealogy.com/tennessee/tn_county/ble.htm
Pure Fountain College Smithville Tennessee 1883

three story brick building with five story tower; burned in 1889; site used for high school at Smithville prior to consolidation in 1963 www.tngenweb.org/dekalb/gdsphist.htm
www.geocities.com/Heartland/Ranch/3627/purefountain.htm
Radnor College Nashville Tennessee 1905 1914 Cumberland Presbyterian college for young women founded by A.N. Eshman; it gained national attention for its complimentary educational tours for students; after the school closed a printing plant on campus served until 1924 as the Cumberland Presbyterian Publishing House; in 1921, a spectacular fire claimed the college’s main building http://www.nashville.gov/mhc/education.htm
Roger Williams University Nashville Tennessee
1929 Baptist
http://docsouth.unc.edu/church/haley/menu.html
Rogersville Synodical College Rogersville Tennessee 1849
Presbyterian founded by Odd Fellows Blandin.  The History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Routt College Jacksonville Tennessee 1905


www.routtcatholic.com/History.htm
Ruskin Cave College Ruskin Tennessee 1904 1922

www.trevecca.edu/about/history
Saint Agnes College Memphis Tennessee

Dominican Sisters of Saint Catherine predecessor of Siena College Schier and Russett.  Catholic Women's Colleges in America.  2002.
Scarritt College of Christian Workers Nashville Tennessee 1892 1988 Methodist Episcopal Scarritt Bible and Training Institute established in Kansas City, MO; moved to Nashville in 1924 as Scarritt College for Christian Workers; from 1980-1988 known as Scarritt Graduate School; Women's Division of United Methodist Church reclaimed ownership when institution closed
http://www.scarrittbennett.org/about/history.aspx
Scotts Hill College Scotts Hill Tennessee 1894 1904

http://henderson-lea.hc.k12tn.net/donahue/he-stuff/shcolreu.htm
Sequachie College
Tennessee 1858 1887

http://travel.nostalgiaville.com/Tennessee/Bledsoe/bledsoe%20county/bledso89.gif
www.segenealogy.com/tennessee/tn_county/ble.htm
Shelby Medical College Nashville Tennessee 1857


www.collphyphil.org/FIND_AID/hist/histlmh1.htm
Siena College Memphis Tennessee 1922 1970 Dominican Sisters of Saint Catherine successor of Saint Agnes College Schier and Russett.  Catholic Women's Colleges in America.  2002.
Soule College Murfreesboro Tennessee 1825 1916 Methodist Episcopal organized as "The Female Academy"; named for Bishop Soule of the ME Church in 1852; clsoed during Civil War when buildings were damaged; reopened after the war www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/8859/soule_college.html
Blandin.  History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Southern Junior College Collegedale Tennessee 1892
Seventh-Day Adventist founded as Graysville Academy, became Southern Industrial School in 1896, Southern Training School in 1901, Southern Junior College in 1916, Southern Missionary College in 1944, Southern College of Seventh-day Adventists in 1982, and Southern Adventist University in 1996 Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.
http://www.southern.edu/?page=about_us/history.php
Southern Normal University Huntingdon Tennessee 1890 1908

www.rootsweb.com/~tncarrol/photos/SNU.htm
Southern Tennessee Normal College Essary Springs Tennessee 1889


Young, M. Norvel.  A History of Colleges Established and Controlled by Members of the Churches of Christ. 1949.
Cummins, D. Duane. 
The Disciples Colleges: A History.  1987.
Southern Y.M.C.A. College Nashville Tennessee 1919 1936

www.ymca.net/about/cont/history.htm
Southwest Tennessee Community College Memphis Tennessee 2000
state supported formed through consolidation on July 1, 2000 of Shelby State Community College (founded in 1972) and the State Technical Institute at Memphis (founded in 1968) http://www.southwest.tn.edu/
Southwestern Baptist University Jackson Tennessee 1874
Tennessee Baptist Convention predecessor to present day Union University; name changed to Union soon after 1907; new charter in 1925 transfering rights from Tennesseee Baptist Convention to Union trustees www.uu.edu/union/about/history.htm
www.henderson-lea.hc.k12n.net/donahue/madison/gsmed.htm
Southwestern Presbyterian University Clarksville Tennessee 1874
Presbyterian name changed to Southwestern Presbyterian in 1924 and institution moved to Memphis, TN; predecessor to Rhodes College; buildings in Clarksville served as foundation for Austin Peay Normal School when it was founded in 1927 as a two-year junior college and teacher training institution www.rhodes.edu/Academics/CollegeCatalogue/GeneralInformation/HistoricalSummary/index.cfm
http://text.apsu.edu/bulletin/history.htm
Southwestern University Jackson Tennessee 1874
Baptist
http://www.crl.edu/content.asp?l1=5&l2=22&l3=39&top=10
Hunt and Carper, eds.  Religious Higher Education in the United States.  1996.
Steed College Johnson City Tennessee 1940 1982


Stewart College Clarksville Tennessee


later Southwestern Presbyterian University and still later, Southwestern-at-Memphis http://www.tngenweb.org/montgomery/wmstewarthis.html
Stonewall  College Cross Plains Tennessee 1877
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)
Cummins, D. Duane.  The Disciples Colleges: A History.  1987.
Strawberry Plains College Jefferson County Tennessee 1848 1865

http://208.183.128.3/rss-history/spcollege.htm
Swift Memorial College Rogersville Tennessee 1883 1955 Presbyterian
http://www.crl.edu/content.asp?l1=5&l2=22&l3=39&top=10
www.tnstate.edu/library/digital/swift.htm
www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WM67KE
Tennessee Agricultural & Industrial State Normal College Nashville Tennessee 1912

became Tennessee State University in 1969; merged with University of Tennessee: Nashville in 1979 Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories.  2003.
Tennessee Christian College Jonesboro Tennessee 1915


Cummins, D. Duane.  The Disciples Colleges: A History.  1987.
Tennessee College for Women Murfreesboro Tennessee 1907 1946 Baptist moved to Lebanon, TN to become part of Cumberland University www.belmont.edu/hr/look.html
Tennessee Conference Female College Columbia Tennessee



http://www.crl.edu/content.asp?l1=5&l2=22&l3=39&top=10
Tennessee Female College Franklin Tennessee 1857
Methodist Episcopal Church South closed during Civil War, reopening in 1865; property sold and operated under several different administrators; burned in 1886 and rebuilt http://www.crl.edu/content.asp?l1=5&l2=22&l3=39&top=10
Blandin.  History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Tennessee Junior College Martin Tennessee 1927

name change to University of Tennessee, Martin in 1951 Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories.  2003.
Tennessee Manual Labor College Ebenezer Tennessee 1867 1872 Disciples of Christ three hundred acres of land purchased for establishing an institution for freedmen; enrollment of as many as 180 students; closed due to financial scandal by corrupt development agents www.tnstate.edu/library/digital/lowery.htm
Tennessee Manual University Nashville Tennessee 1868
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)
Cummins, D. Duane.  The Disciples Colleges: A History.  1987.
Terrill College Decherd Tennessee 1889 1906

http://www.crl.edu/content.asp?l1=5&l2=22&l3=39&top=10
Tomlinson College Cleveland Tennessee
1992
lost SACS accreditation in 1992
Turner College Shelbyville Tennessee 1886
African Methodist Episcopal The Tennessee Conference in 1885, Bishop Turner presiding, passed a
 resolution to establish the school. Revs. E. Tyree (now bishop), T. B.
Caldwell and G. W. Bryant were the committee to locate the school,
which was first called Shelbyville High School. The first principal was
Rev. C. S. Bowman, who also pastored the Shelbyville A. M. E. Church.
Succeeding presidents have been Revs B. A. J. Nixon, W. H. Shelby,
C. H. Boone, J. H. Boone, and the present incumbent, Rev. J. A. Jones.
In 1896 the institution was chartered as "Turner Normal and Industrial
Institute," which has later been changed to "Turner College." The
departments are theological, English, normal, college, preparatory,
commercial, music, sewing and millinery. There were last year 137
students and 9 teachers. There have been 33 graduates from the
normal course. Among the distinguished graduates is Rev. H. L.
P. Jones, pastor of St. Paul Church, Nashville, Tenn. The property
 consists of 2 acres and 3 buildings, valued at $30,000. The
institution is supported by the Tennessee conferences.
Its income is about $5,000 per year. (Wright)
http://docsouth.unc.edu/church/wright/ill366.html
http://docsouth.unc.edu/church/wright/wright.html
U. S. Grant University Athens / Chattanooga Tennessee 1889
Methodist formed by consolidation of Chattanooga and Grant Memorial University; predecessor of Tennessee Wesleyan College Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories.  2003.
Union University Murfreesboro Tennessee 1848 1873 Baptist General Assembly of Tennessee closed from 1859 until 1868, then reopened briefly before closing permanently in 1873; considered a predecessor of Union University in Jackson, TN; www.uu.edu/about/
University of Dixie Cookeville Tennessee 1909

name change to Tennessee Polytechnic Institute in 1915; to Tennessee Technological University in 1965 Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories.  2003.
University of Nashville  Nashville Tennessee


closed by Peabody Board of Trust for founding of Peabody College http://web.utk.edu/~ddonahue/turner/gt-c13c.htm
Mathis, David. Image, Institution, and Leadership: Philip Lindsley and the Modern University Presidency, 1825-1850. Ed.D. dissertation. 1985.
http://www.bonps.org/tour/westernmilitary.htm
Videmour College Warren County Tennessee



www.rootsweb.com/~tnwcogs/docs/goodsp02.html
Walden University Nashville Tennessee 1900 1925 Methodist institution started to decline, particularly after depression of 1914-15; medical department formed a separate Meharry Medical College in 1915; Walden renamed Walden College in 1922 and moved to new site operating as a junior college until financial difficulties forced closure; campus vacant until 1935 when leased by Trevecca Nazarene College  http://www.tnstate.edu/library/digital/walden.htm
http://docsouth.unc.edu/church/haley/menu.html
Ward-Belmont Nashville Tennessee 1913 1951
successor to Ward Seminary and Belmont Junior College; indebtedness assumed by Tennessee Baptist Convention which opend Belmont College http://www.belmont.edu/hr/look.html
Washington and Tusculum College Greeneville Tennessee 1908 1912
institutions merge for a brief time before parting http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~bridgett/tnchron.htm
http://ajmuseum.tusculum.edu/tcarchives.html
Washington College Washington College Tennessee 1780

founded as an academy in 1780; continues today offering high school courses as  Washington College Academy www.wca-pvt.com/history.htm
Waters and Walling College McMinnville Tennessee 1874
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) William Davis Carnes selected as president in 1878, but resigned before dying November 1879; evolved into the McMinnville public school after 1886 Cummins, D. Duane.  The Disciples Colleges: A History.  1987.
www.therestorationmovement.com/carnes,wd.htm
www.tngennet.org/warren/gdsp-dex.htm
West Tennessee Christian College Henderson Tennessee 1869
Churches of Christ founded as Henderson Male and Female Institute, became Henderson Masonic Male and Female Institute in 1877, became West Tennessee Christian College in 1885, Georgia Robertson Christian College in 1897, National Teachers Normal and Business College in 1907, and after 1919 Freed-Hardeman College; (some references refer to Georgia Roberson College) Young, M. Norvel.  A History of Colleges Established and Controlled by Members of the Churches of Christ. 1949.
Hunt and Carper, eds. 
Religious Higher Education in the United States. 1996.
www.fcoc.com/history/barret.htm
www.rootsweb.com/~tncheste/goodspeed.shtml
Songe, Alice H. 
American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.
West Tennessee College Murfreesboro Tennessee 1844 1874 Baptist reopened by Southwestern Baptist University after 1874; Blackmar gives location as Jackson www.uu.edu/about/
www.henderson-lea.hc.k12n.net/donahue/madison/gsmed.htm
Hunt and Carper, eds.  Religious Higher Education in the United States.  1996.
Blackmar, Frank W. "The History of Federal and State Aid to Higher Education in the United States," in Herbert B. Adams, ed.  Contributions to American Educational History. 1890.
West Tennessee State Teachers College Memphis Tennessee 1912
state supported founded as West Tennessee Normal School; became West Tennessee State Teachers College in 1925; name change to Memphis State College in 1941, to Memphis State University in 1957 and to the University of Memphis in 1994 Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories.  2003.
Wirt College near Hartsville Tennessee 1838

founded as Wirt Seminary; later known as Enon College Burke, Colin B.  American Collegiate Populations. 1982.
www.hartsvilletrousdale.com/History.html
Woodbury College Woodbury Tennessee 1855
Baptist
http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~cannonco/cancogsp.html
Y.M.C.A. Graduate School Nashville Tennessee 1927 1936
building purchased by Vanderbilt www.vanderbilt.edu/News/register/Oct16_01/story12.html
Zion College Chattanooga Tennessee


later Chattanooga City College, one of the predecessors of the University of Tennessee-Chattanooga







last update: 10/3/2011





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