Home:: Colleges in North Carolina that have closed, merged, or changed their names

Colleges in North Carolina that have closed, merged, or changed their names

College Name City State Start Date End Date Affiliation Other Information Source
Agricultural & Mechanical College for the Colored Race Raleigh North Carolina 1891
state supported moved to Greensboro, NC in 1893; name change to Agricultural & Technical College of North Carolina in 1915; to North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University in 1967 Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories. 2003.
American College Charlotte North Carolina



www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
Asheville Female College Asheville North Carolina 1842

initially founded as Asheville Female Seminary; later, Holston Conference Female College, and still later known as Asheville College; Asheville College admitted to state system in 1960's http://www.lib.unc.edu/highered/list.html
Blandin.  History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Asheville-Biltmore College Asheville North Carolina 1936

established as Biltmore Junior College in 1927; became Biltmore College in 1934, Asheville-Biltmore College in 1936; entered North Caroline system as first state-supported community college in 1957; in 1969 became University of North Carolina at Asheville www.unca.edu/welcome/about.html
Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.
Asheville Normal and Teachers College Asheville North Carolina 1887
Presbyterian opened as Home Industrial School with support from Board of National Missions of the Presbyterian Church; became Asheville Normal and Teachers College in 1931; after closing, the property served as Memorial Mission Hospital; alumni records maintained by Warren Wilson College  http://www.warren-wilson.edu/~advancement/alumni_relations.php
Atlantic Christian College Wilson North Carolina 1902
Disciples of Christ now Barton College, name changed in 1990 http://www.barton.edu/
Hunt and Carper, eds.  Religious Higher Education in the United States.  1996.
Baptist Female University Raleigh North Carolina 1838
Baptist name changed in 1904 to Baptist University for Women and in 1909 to Meredith College www.meredith.edu/inaugural/history.htm
Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes. 1978.
Barber Memorial College Concord North Carolina 1930

merged with Scotia Women's College in 1916 to form Barber-Scotia College Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.
Barber Scotia College Concord North Carolina 1916
Presbyterian lost SACS accreditation in 2004 and announced suspention of classes after 2004-05 academic year; reopened fall 2008 http://www.b-sc.edu/
Bennett College Greensboro North Carolina



http://statelibrary.dcr.state.nc.us/iss/EraOfProgress/bennett.gif
Biddle University Charlotte North Carolina 1876

initially presidents and majority of faculty were white; Daniel J. Sanders in 1891 was the first black president; name later changed to Johnson C. Smith University in 1923 pictures of main building and campus at
libweb.uncc.edu/archives/landmarks/biddle.htm
Songe, Alice H. 
American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes. 1978.
http://docsouth.unc.edu/nc/ncinstruction1898/ncinstruction1898.html
Biscayne Southern College Concord, Charlotte, Gastonia North Carolina 1892 2002

http://www.archives.ncdcr.gov/default.htm
Black Mountain College Black Mountain North Carolina 1933 1956
organization and curriculum based on educational theories of John Rice combining liberal and fine arts; www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
http://www.main.nc.us/bmc/bmcref/bmc.html
www.bmcproject.org
Blanton's Junior College Asheville North Carolina
1992

www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
http://closedcollege.bizland.com
Boiling Springs College Boiling Springs North Carolina 1928

Gardner-Webb College after 1942  http://www.crl.edu/content.asp?l1=5&l2=22&l3=39&top=10
Brian Business College Asheboro North Carolina



http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
Bricks Junior College Enfield North Carolina

Northern Congregational
http://www.ucc.org/aboutus/histories/chap2.htm
Buncombe County Junior College Asheville North Carolina 1927

name change to Biltmore Junior College in 1930; to Asheville-Biltmore College in 1936; became first two-year institution to become state-supported community college; name change to University of North Carolina at Asheville in 1969 www.unca.edu/welcome/about.html
Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories. 2003.
Burnsville Baptist College Burnsville North Carolina

Baptist
http://www.ls.net/~newriver/nc/wnc17.htm
Carolina Business College Charlotte North Carolina



http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
Carolina College for Young Women Maxton North Carolina 1912 1926 Methodist later sold and opened as Presbyterian Junior College in 1929 http://www.crl.edu/content.asp?l1=5&l2=22&l3=39&top=10
Carolina Female College Ansonville North Carolina 1849 1868

http://www.co.anson.nc.us/ansonco/anson2.htm
Carolina New College Burnsville North Carolina


successor to Stanley McCormick School http://www.lib.unc.edu/ncc/ref/s75/s75Ca.html
Carver College Charlotte North Carolina



http://www.crl.edu/content.asp?l1=5&l2=22&l3=39&top=10
Charlotte Business College Charlotte North Carolina



http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
Charlotte College Charlotte North Carolina 1949

admitted to NC State System in 1965 as University of North Carolina at Charlotte http://www.lib.unc.edu/highered/list.html
Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.
Charlotte Commercial College Charlotte North Carolina 1891

L.H. Jackson and R.F. Day were owners; in 1896 moved to the Y.M.C.A. http://www.cmstory.org/history/hornets/educate.htm
Cherokee Indian Normal School Pembroke North Carolina 1887
state supported now University of North Carolina at Pembroke; from 1939-1953 the only four-year college for Indians in the nation www.uncp.edu/uncp/uncp_history.htm
Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories. 2003.
Chowan Baptist Female Institute Murfreesboro North Carolina 1848
Baptist name change to Chowan College in 1910 and to Chowan University in 2006 Blandin.  The History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
www.chowan.edu
Claremont College Hickory North Carolina 1880 1915 Reformed (German) Church property acquired by Hickory Public Schools in 1916 http://www.lib.unc.edu/highered/list.html
www.ccel.org/s/schaff/encyc/encyc09/htm/iv.vii.cvi.htm
www.ci.hickory.nc.us/library/claremt.html
College of St. Mary of Help Belmont North Carolina 1876
Benedictine name changed to Belmont Abbey in 1918 (Brenner gives date of 1913) www.famousamericans.net/jeremiahjosephoconneli/
Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories.  2003.
Concord Female Presbyterian College Statesville North Carolina 1854
Presbyterian
http://docsouth.unc.edu/nc/report1869/report1869.html
Concordia College Conover North Carolina 1877 1933 Evangelical Lutheran Church sponsored by Tennessee Synod until 1892 when control was assumed by Missouri Synod; Solberg gives 1935 as closing date www.rootsweb.com/~nccatawb/concord1.htm
www.nclutheran.org/resources/history.html
Solberg.  Lutheran Higher Education in North America.  1985.
Crescent Academy and Business College Crescent North Carolina 1896 1913

http://docsouth.unc.edu/nc/ncinstruction1898/ncinstruction1898.html

Source - Tenth Annual Catalogue of Crescent Academy and Business College, Crescent, NC  1905-1906 Newton N.C. The News Publishing Co. 1906.  
Croft Business College Durham, Greensboro North Carolina



http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
Davenport College for Young Women Lenoir North Carolina 1858 1933 Methodist Report of Supt. Of Public Instruction gives 1856 as founding date; merged with Greensboro College http://www.crl.edu/content.asp?l1=5&l2=22&l3=39&top=10
Blandin.  History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
http://docsouth.unc.edu/nc/report1869/report1869.html
Brenner, Morgan G. 
The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories.  2003.
David Caldwell's Log College
North Carolina 1766 1822

http://www.lib.unc.edu/highered/list.html
Draughon's Business College Winston-Salem North Carolina



http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
Durham Business College Durham North Carolina



http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
East Coast Bible College Charlotte North Carolina 1976 1999 Church of God merged with Lee University, Cleveland, TN The Chronicle of Higher Education, June 14, 2002
Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories.  2003.
Edenborough Medical College Raeford North Carolina 1867 1877

http://www.ncmarkers.com/print_marker.aspx?id=I-41
Edenton Normal & Industrial College Edenton North Carolina 1895 1928 African Methodist Episcopal Zion Charles M. Gaines, president with 7 teachers and 126 students in 1908 http://www.co.chowan.nc.us/aainside.pdf
http://docsouth.unc.edu/church/harris/harris.html
http://statelibrary.dcr.state.nc.us/iss/EraOfProgress/edentonnormal.gif
Edgeworth Female Seminary Greensboro North Carolina 1840 1871
operated a collegiate course after 1845; closed during Civil War; reopened from 1862-1868; burned in 1872 Blandin.  The History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Edwards Military College?
North Carolina



http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
Elizabeth College Charlotte North Carolina 1897 1915 Lutheran The college was the fulfillment of a dream of Dr. Charles Banks King to establish a grade "A" college under the auspices of the Lutheran church. He had the good will and financial support of his father-in-law, Mr. Gerard Snowden Watts, wealthy tobacconist of Baltimore. There was great elation, according to the Charlotte Observer for May 28, 1896, because of the selection of Charlotte as the site of the new college. Charlotte people provided $9,332 cash as an inducement, and the Highland Park Land and Improvement Company donated $3,600 and twenty acres for a campus, to top the offer made by Columbia, S. C.  In an article about "Early Schools and Education in Charlotte" in the Charlotte Observer for June 18, 1933, Mrs. J. A. Yarbrough recalled that "In the fall of 1896, the doors of Elizabeth College, under the presidency of Dr. Charles Banks King, were opened. The efforts of administration and faculty met with a ready response in the hearts and minds of parents of young girls. The handsome Gerard Conservatory of Music was presented by Mrs. King's father, Mr. Gerard Snowden Watts King, the
son of Dr. and Mrs. King. Ill health influenced Dr. King to move the college
to Salem, Virginia (1915) where its name was retained after consolidation
with Roanoke College for Women. In 1921 Elizabeth College in Virginia
was burned to the ground and all records destroyed.
www.nclutheran.org/resources/history.html
www.cmhpf.org/essays/elizabeth.html
Solberg.  Lutheran Higher Education in North America.  1985.
http://www.cmstory.org/history/hornets/educate.htm
Elizabeth City State Teachers College Elizabeth City North Carolina 1891
state supported founded as Elizabeth City State Colored Normal School; name change to Elizabeth City State Teachers College in 1939; to Elizabeth City State College in 1963; to Elizabeth City State University in 1969; http://www.ecsu.edu/
Evans College of Commerce Concord, Gastonia North Carolina



http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
Fayetteville Female Seminary Fayetteville North Carolina 1854

first president was a prominent minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church South; closed during Civil War and never reopened Blandin.  The History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Flora MacDonald College Red Springs North Carolina 1896 1961 Presbyterian name changed in 1903 to Southern Presbyterian College and Conservatory of Music and back to Flora Macdonald College in 1916; merged with Presbyterian Junior College to become Saint Andrews College at Laurinburg www.floramacdonald.org/history/history.html
Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories. 2003.
Floral College Maxton North Carolina 1847 1887 Presbyterian
Blandin.  The History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Frankinton Christian College Frankinton North Carolina 1873 1930 American Christian Church operated as a college after 1904 www.ucc.org/aboutus/histories/chap2.htm
Gaston College
North Carolina 1887 1905 Lutheran
www.nclutheran.org/resources/history.html
http://www.lib.unc.edu/highered/list.html
Goldsboro Female College
North Carolina 1854 1871

http://www.lib.unc.edu/highered/list.html
Graham College Graham North Carolina 1859 1863 Christian Church closed during Civil War
Graham Normal College Graham North Carolina 1881 1892 Christian Church a high school was operated on the former Graham College site following the Civil War; the name was changed to Graham Normal in 1881; destroyed by fire in 1892; considered a predecessor to Elon College Stokes, Durward T.  Elon College: Its History and Traditions.  Elon College Alumni Association, 1982.
Greensboro Evening College Greensboro North Carolina
1953
merged with Guilford College Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.
Greensboro Female College Greensboro North Carolina 1838 1903 Methodist Episcopal Church closed after fire in 1863; reopened in 1873 http://libweb.uncc.edu/archives/ncscenes/an11-7u.JPG
Blandin.  History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Guilford College Greensboro North Carolina 1837
Religious Society of Friends founded as New Garden Boarding School; name change to Guildford College in 1888 http://www.guilford.edu/
Hamilton College Charlotte, Gastonia North Carolina



http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
Hamlet Hospital School of Nursing
North Carolina



http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
Hardbarger Junior College of Business Raleigh North Carolina



http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
High Point College High Point North Carolina 1924
Methodist Protestant name change to High Point University in 1991 http://www.highpoint.edu
High Point Female College High Point North Carolina 1889 1893
successor to Thomasville Female College Blandin.  The History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Highland College Hickory North Carolina 1891
North Carolina Synod of Lutheran Church in America name changed to Lenoir Rhyne College in 1923 Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.
Holman Christian University Black Mountain North Carolina 1905


Cummins, D. Duane.  The Disciples Colleges: A History.  1987.
Immanuel Lutheran College Greensboro North Carolina 1903 1960 Lutheran founded in Concord, moved two years later to Greensboro; N.J. Bakke, president with 8 teachers and 78 students in 1908; after 1930 operated as coeducational junior college www.greensborohistory.org/archives/docs.htm
www.carolinacuzins.org/PC-Immanuelcoll.html
Solberg.  Lutheran Higher Education in North America.  1985.
http://statelibrary.dcr.state.nc.us/iss/EraOfProgress/immanuellutheran.gif
Industrial Christian College Dawson North Carolina 1907


Cummins, D. Duane.  The Disciples Colleges: A History.  1987.
Jamestown Female College Jamestown North Carolina 1859 1861 Methodist Protestant four-story brick building, destroyed by fire and never rebuilt
Jefferson College Greensboro North Carolina



http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
John Wesley College Greensboro North Carolina 1903

founded as the Greensboro Bible and Training School; in 1913 the name was changed The Greensboro Bible and Literary School; closed in 1931; reopened under new name of People’s Bible School on January 25, 1932 in the same facilities with many of the same teachers and students; in 1936 the college moved to the Grove Park area of Greensboro; name change in 1949 to People’s Bible College and then to John Wesley College in 1956; the institution moved to its present site in 1980; name change to Laurel University in 2011 www.laureluniversity.edu
Judson College Hendersonville North Carolina 1882 1892

http://www.lib.unc.edu/highered/list.html
Kings College
North Carolina



http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
Kinston College
North Carolina 1882 1891

http://www.lib.unc.edu/highered/list.html
Kittrell College Kittrell North Carolina 1886 1974 African Methodist Episcopal incorporated by the legislature of North Carolina, March 7, 1887. The North Carolina Conference, presided over by Bishop Dickerson, at its session in 1885, had authorized the establishment of the school and purchase of property. Leading spirit was Rev. R. H. W. Leak. The first teachers were Prof. B. B. Goines (principal), Mrs. M. A. Goines (matron), and Prof. J. R. Hawkins (business manager). In 1888 the Virginia Conference agreed to aid Kittrell. The following have served as principals since Prof. Goines: J. R. Hawkins, C. G. O'Kelly, J. S. Williams, P. W. Dawkins, John L. Wheeler, W. H. Giles, D. J. Jordan and C. G. O'Kelly (second time), but to no man does it owe more than to Prof. Hawkins, who has been in intimate touch with it since the beginning. The courses given are theological, classical, academic, normal, grammar, musical and commercial. Last year there were 311 pupils and 12 teachers; 290 have graduated, among whom are Rev. G. W. Adams, Drs. L. E. McCauley, S. L. Warren and J. L. Mills, J. M. Avery and W. S. King. There are 6 buildings, 62 acres of land, the property valued at $75,000. The income is
 about $15,000 per year, the term, eight months. (Wright)
http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
http://docsouth.unc.edu/church/wright/wright.html
http://statelibrary.dcr.state.nc.us/iss/EraOfProgress/kittrell.pdf
Lafayette College Fayetteville North Carolina



http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
Lenoir-Rhyne College Hickory North Carolina 1891
North Carolina Synod of Lutheran Church in America see also entry for Highland College; name changed to Lenoir-Rhyne University August 2008 http://www.lrc.edu/
Linwood Female College Gastonia North Carolina 1884 1921 Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church founded as a school for girls; later known as Jones Seminary; operated as Linwood Female College from 1904-1915; became co-ed and the name was changed to Linwood College Patterson, Homer L., ed.  Patterson's American Educational Directory, Vol. XVII.  Chicago: American Education Company, 1920.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linwood_Female_College
Littleton Colege Littleton North Carolina 1882 1919

http://www.lib.unc.edu/highered/list.html
Louisburg Female College Louisburg North Carolina 1826


Blandin.  The History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Mecklenburg Female College Charlotte North Carolina 1867 1869
The N. C. Military Institute closed at the start of the Civil War and was used as a hospital during the war.  It was later occupied by the Mecklenburg Female College. Rev. A. G. Stacy was the founder and president during its brief existence. An advertisement for this school states that there were 155 students from five states who paid $103 per term of 10 months for board, tuition, fuel, light, and contingent fees. The only remaining source of information concerning this college is a complete set of four issues of a magazine entitled, The Carrier Dove or Mecklenburg Female College Magazine. http://docsouth.unc.edu/nc/mecklenbug/mecklenburg.html
http://www.cmstory.org/history/hornets/educate.htm
Mitchell College Statesville North Carolina 1856



Mitchell Junior College Misenheimer North Carolina 1928
Methodist established as Oberlin Home and School in 1885 near Lenoir, NC; became Mitchell Home School in 1903; moved to Misenheimer in 1910, became Mitchell Junior College in 1928, Pfeiffer Junior College in 1935 and name changed to Pfeiffer College in 1954 www.pfeiffer.edu/About/history.cfm
Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.
Methodist College Fayetteville North Carolina 1960
North Carolina Conference of the Methodist Church name changed to Methodist University in 2006 http://www.methodist.edu/Home/history.htm
Mount Pleasant Female Seminary Mount Pleasant North Carolina 1859
North Carolina Synod of Evangelical Luteran Church in America later known as Mont Amoena Seminary; survived the war, won Synod adoption in 1869, received state charter authorizing academic degrees
Negro Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina Greensboro North Carolina

state supported now North Carolina A&T
North Carolina College Mount Pleasant North Carolina 1855 1902 Evangelical Lutheran Church in America Solberg gives starting date as 1859, closed during Civil War, reopened in 1867 www.nclutheran.org/resources/history.html
Solberg.  Lutheran Higher Education in North America.  1985.
http://docsouth.unc.edu/nc/report1869/report1869.html
North Carolina College for Negroes Durham North Carolina 1919

established as National Religious Training School and Chatauqua; sld and reorganized in 1915 as National Training School; became Durham State Normal School in 1923; control assumed by state and became North Carolina College for Negroes n 1925, North Carolina College at Durham in 1947 and now North Carolina Central University after 1969 www.nccu.edu
Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.
North Carolina College for Women Greensboro North Carolina 1891
state supported established as State Normal and Industrial School, became State Normal and Industrial College in 1897, North Carolia College for Women in 1919, Women's College of the University of North Carolina in 1932, and now University of North Carolina-Greensboro after 1963 www.uncg.edu/home/Text/hist-txt.html
Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.
North Carolina Medical College Davidson North Carolina 1887 1914
In 1886 the Presbyterian women of Charlotte equipped a small infirmary for the use of Davidson College students under treatment of Dr. Paul B. Barringer, the college physician, who also had some private classes in anatomy and physiology which were attended by students preparing for northern medical schools. When Dr. Barringer left in 1889 to become associated with the University of Virginia, he sold his "Medical School," as it had come to be known, to Dr. John Peter Munroe, who had succeeded him as college physician.  Though never a member of the faculty of Davidson College, Dr. Munroe had long been identified with it as a student (1882) and physician, and his pre-medical classes became an important part of the village activities. These classes formed the basis for the North Carolina Medical College, chartered in 1892. In 1903 the upper classes of the Medical College were removed to Charlotte where the students could take advantage of the facilities offered by the newly-organized Presbyterian Hospital. In 1907 the entire student body of the Medical College came to Charlotte where it occupied its own building on
the southeast corner of Sixth and Church Streets, a building known since
1913 as the Churchill Apartments.  During its lifetime, the North Carolina
Medical College had on its faculty many of the leading medical men of
Charlotte, who were instrumental in awarding the degree of Doctor of
Medicine to 340 men. A complete history of this institution, listing faculty
members and students, is contained in The North Carolina Medical College,
written by Dr. Robert H. Lafferty, published 1946. When it became evident
that the college could not longer meet the increasingly exacting demands
of modern medical training, the college suspended operation. The entire
student body was transferred in 1913 to the Medical College of Virginia
in Richmond where they were entered in the regular classes and the
diplomas conferred in the name of the North Carolina Medical College.
http://he.net/~brumley/tour/history/medicalcollege.htm
http://www.cmstory.org/history/hornets/educate.htm
North State Business College Kannapolis, High Point North Carolina



http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
Olin College Iredell County North Carolina 1853


http://docsouth.unc.edu/nc/report1869/report1869.html
Oxford Female College
North Carolina 1851 1925

http://www.lib.unc.edu/highered/list.html
Peace College Raleigh North Carolina 1857
Presbyterian founded as Peace Institute; closed during the Civil War and re-opened in 1872; name change in 2011 to William Peace University http://www.peace.edu/content/page/id/174
Phillips Junior College Fayetteville North Carolina
1992

www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
http://closedcollege.bizland.com
Pineland College Salemburg North Carolina



http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
Plymouth State Normal School
North Carolina



UNC Library Archives web site
Presbyterian College for Women Charlotte North Carolina 1857
Presbyterian Dr. and Mrs. Burwell headed Charlotte Female Institute until 1872, when they were succeeded by Robert Hett Chapman and Stephen Taylor Martin, jointly, and then by Dr. Martin alone. In 1878 Dr. William Robert Atkinson bought the school and conducted it until 1891, when it was closed.  Charlotte would have been left without a school for girls had not Miss Lily Long, with the aid of Mrs. Tinsley Junkin, Mrs. Bessie Dewey, and Miss Rose Franklin organized the Charlotte Seminary for Girls which was located on 510 North Tryon Street. Some of Charlotte's best known women attended Charlotte Female Institute and Charlotte Seminary for Girls, including: Mrs. John VanLandingham, Mrs. Margaret Springs Kelly, Mrs. J. P. Durant, Mrs. Bessie Myers, Mrs. I. W. Faison, Mrs. C. C. Kennedy, Mrs. w. A. Zweier, Mrs. C. M. Carson, Mrs. George Fitzsimmons, Mrs. W. H. Twitty, Mrs. J. A. Durham, Mrs. H. A. Murrill, and the Misses Alice Springs, Sallie Phillips, Laura Orr, and Charlee Hutchison.  The Charlotte Seminary for Girls continued until 1896, at which time the Presbytery of Concord and Mecklenburg established the
Presbyterian College for Women, acquiring and enlarging the building once
used by Charlotte Female Institute. When the college was ready to open,
Dr. J. R. Bridges was chosen as president. With Miss Lily Long as lady
principal, the good will and records of the Seminary which she had
organized were taken over by the new college. In 1912 the name
was changed to Queens College and the institution removed to the site
of the present campus.
www.queens.edu/queens/history.htm
Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.
http://www.cmstory.org/history/hornets/educate.htm
Presbyterian Junior College Maxton North Carolina 1929 1961
Presbyterian Church purchased property of Carolina College for Women in 1929; PJC merged with Flora McDonald of Red Springs to become Saint Andrews College at Laurinburg in 1961 Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories. 2003.
Queens College
North Carolina 1767 1780

http://www.lib.unc.edu/highered/list.html
Roanoke Bible College Elizabeth City North Carolina 1948

name change to Mid Atlantic Christian University http://www.dailyadvance.com/news/rbc-is-now-mid-atlantic-christian-university-580468.html
Rutherford College Rutherford College North Carolina 1853 1935 Methodist Episcopal Church, South founded as Oak Hollow Academy; name changed to Rutherford Academy in 1858 and to Rutherford College after 1870; merged with Weaverville College in 1934 and with Brevard Institute, also in 1934, to become Brevard College http://www.ci.rutherford-college.nc.us/rchsites.htm
Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories.  2003.
Rutledge College
North Carolina



http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
Sacred Heart College Belmont North Carolina 1892 1988 Sisters of Mercy
www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
http://closedcollege.bizland.com
Schier and Russett.  Catholic Women's Colleges in America.  2002.
St. Andrews Presbyterian College Laurinburg North Carolina

Presbyterian created following 1958 merger of  Flora Macdonald College and Presbyterian Junior College.  Operates as a branch of Webber International University (Florida) following 2011 merger.  Name change to St. Andrews University in September 2011. http://www.sapc.edu/aboutsa/history.php
Saint Genevieve-of-the-Pines College Ashville North Carolina 1912 1956 Religious of Christian Education
Schier and Russett.  Catholic Women's Colleges in America.  2002.
www.cdschool.org/History.htm
Saint John's College Oxford North Carolina 1858 1872 Masonic became an orphanage www.ibiblio.org/orphanage/history
Saint Mary's College Raleigh North Carolina 1842 1998 Episcopal college for women; established junior college program in 1927 August 1, 1997 Chronicle of Higher Education
Blandin.  History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Hunt and Carper, eds. 
Religious Higher Education in the United States.  1996.
Salisbury Business College Salisbury North Carolina



http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
Scotia Women's College Concord North Carolina 1867

founded as Scotia Seminary; name changed to Scotia Women's College I 1916; merged with Barber Memorial College in 1930 to become Barber-Scotia College Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories.  2003.
South Piedmont Community College

1999
state supported SPCC traces its roots to the Ansonville unit of the Charlotte Industrial Education Center;  originally designated as the Ansonville Industrial Education Center in November 1962; in 1967 it became the Anson Technical Institute, a unit of the Department of Community Colleges of North Carolina; Anson Technical Institute then became a separately chartered institution on July 1, 1971; in 1979 it became Anson Technical College and in 1987, Anson Community College; in 1999 ACC and the Union Technical Education Center were combined to form SPCC http://www.spcc.edu/about.php?item=12
Southern Presbyterian College Rock Springs North Carolina 1896 1961
founded as Reed Springs Seminary, name change to Southern Presbyterian College in 1903, name change to Flora McDonald College in 1916 www.floramacdonald.com/history/history.html
Southwood College Salemburg North Carolina 1875 1973
now the North Carolina Justice Academy's eastern campus; established in 1875 as Salem Academy, the campus has subsequently functioned as Pineland School for Girls, Pineland Junior College, Edwards Military Institute and finally Southwood College; attended by "Pistol" Pete Maravich in 1960's www.fayettevilleobserver.com/news/archives/1999/tx99nov/n11salm8.htm
www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
State Normal & Industrial College Greensboro North Carolina 1891
state supported see entry for North Carolina College for Women Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories. 2003.
Statesville Female College Statesville North Carolina 1857
Presbyterian
Blandin.  The History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Thomasville Female College
North Carolina 1849 1889
successor to Sylva Grove Female Seminary and Glen Anna Seminary; predecessor to High Point Female College Blandin.  The History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Trinity College Randolph County North Carolina 1838
Methodist Episcopal Church, South founded as Union Institute; after 1851, Normal College; in 1859, name changed to Trinity; in 1891 moved to Durham and served as foundation for Duke University http://www.duke.edu/web/Archives/history/narrativehistory.html
Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories.  2003.
Vardell Hall Red Springs North Carolina 1964 1972
girls prepatory school and junior college; operated on grounds of former Flora Macdonald College www.floramacdonald.org/history/history.html
Warren Wilson College Swannanoa North Carolina 1894
Presbyterian established as Asheville Farm School; merged with Dorland-Bell School (Hot Springs, NC) in 1942; adopted name of Warren H. Wilson Vocational Junior College and Associated Schools; becomes 4-yr in 1967;  http://www.warren-wilson.edu/info/history.php
Warrenton Female College Warrenton North Carolina 1841 1866
initially founded by Presbyterians; acquired in 1856 by members of Methodist Church South; briefly opened from 1870-1873 Blandin.  The History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Weaverville College Weaverville North Carolina 1856
Methodist Church, South merged with Rutherford College and Brevard Institute to become Brevard College in 1935 http://www.ci.rutherford-college.nc.us/rchsites.htm
Wesleyan College Kernersville North Carolina 1946 1972 Wesleyan Church founded as Kernersville Bible College; merged with Penn Wesleyan College and Wesleyan College (Frankfort, IN) to form United Wesleyan College Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.
www.wesleyan.org/doc/history/milestones.htm
Wesleyan Female College Murfreesboro North Carolina 1853 1893 Methodist Episcopal Church South was not reopened after a fire in 1893 Blandin.  The History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Wilmington College Wilmington North Carolina 1947

admitted to NC State System in 1969 as University of North Carolina at Wilmington http://www.lib.unc.edu/highered/list.html
Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories. 2003.
Winsalm Business College Winston-Salem North Carolina



http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
Winston-Salem Business College Winston-Salem North Carolina



http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
Worth Business College Fayetteville North Carolina



http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/archives/arch/college.htm
Yadkin College Yadkin College North Carolina 1856 1895 Methodist Protestant 1924 given for closing date at http://www.lib.unc.edu/highered/list.html http://closedcollege.bizland.com
Burke, Colin B. American Collegiate Populations. 1982.
Zion Wesley College Salisbury North Carolina 1879
African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church founded as Zion Wesley Institute in Concord, NC; moved to Salisbury, NC and became Zion Wesley College in 1885 and Livingstone College in 1887 Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.







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