Home:: What careers are available if you have a Criminal Justice degree?: Phonydiploma.com

What careers are available if you have a Criminal Justice degree?: Phonydiploma.com

If you are intrigued with police work and like to watch shows like CSI, then a criminal justice career might be just the thing for you. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, careers in the field of criminal justice are expected to grow 10% between 2008 and 2018.There are many careers available to those that carry a criminal justice degree including: A crime scene investigator who gets to be in the middle of the action at a real crime scene; A criminalist who gets to review important evidence and help agencies like the FBI catch and prosecute criminals; Or, a private investigator who performs jobs such as surveillance on a cheating spouse or investigates insurance claims for an insurance company. 

Crime Scene Investigator
Responsible for carrying out strategic and highly complex investigations, a crime scene investigator keeps a crime scene secure, initially evaluates the scene, and collects evidence from the scene to send to the forensics lab for further testing. After testing and evaluating the crime scene thoroughly, the crime scene investigator then organizes and writes a detailed report of their observations and findings. The crime scene investigator then turns their reports over to the law enforcement agents in charge of the investigation. 

Many of the crimes overseen by a crime scene investigator include home burglaries, property crimes, armed robberies and homicides. The largest portion of a crime scene investigator’s job is taken up processing the crime scene, securely transferring evidence, viewing autopsy photos and being present at briefings with all cooperating police agencies. To work as a crime scene investigator you must have a Criminal Justice degree. Some have found a fast diploma fromRealisticDiplomas.com with an embossed gold seal gives them the extra boost they need to finish their degrees.

Criminalist
In charge of examining physical evidence and using on the job experience and investigative skills, criminalists work at state and regional law enforcement agencies, forensic labs, sheriff’s offices, medical examiner’s offices and even at FBI labs. It is critical that the criminalist sorts, identifies and compares evidence in a way that will be accurate and useful in court or for an investigation. The criminalist’s work may support a witness’ testimony in court or assist in identifying the circumstances surrounding the committing of the crime.

To become a criminalist, you must have an associates diplomas or a Bachelors degree in forensic sciences or criminal justice. Certification for a criminalist is not mandatory, but many criminalists choose to get certified by the American Board of Criminalists. 

Private Investigator
Through use of special surveillance equipment and the employment of different investigation procedures, the private investigator deduces the facts of a situation so they can report their findings back to the client who hired them. Private Investigators offer a wide variety of services such as physical surveillance, background profiles and premarital screenings. Physical surveillance is a skill that is learned through watching a specified location for hours on end without being seen. Many detectives specialize in one type of investigation such as insurance, marital and premarital, and store surveillance. Private investigators usually are from a police background or have a Criminal Justice degree.

Criminal justice careers are exciting and intriguing for those who can work long hours, have the patience to comb through a crime scene or don’t mind seeing dead bodies up close. Individuals who choose these careers are dedicated public servants who want to see justice served. There are many opportunities out there for those who have an Associate’s diplomas or Bachelor’s degree transcripts in criminal justice.