Home:: Colleges in Mississippi that have closed, merged, or changed their names

Colleges in Mississippi that have closed, merged, or changed their names

College Name City State Start Date End Date Affiliation Other Information Source
All Saints College Vicksburg Mississippi 1907 1962 Episcopal founded to educate women; high school and junior college; college discontinued and name changed to All Saints School in 1962 http://www.crl.edu/content.asp?l1=5&l2=22&l3=39&top=10
Hunt and Carper, eds.  Religious Higher Education in the United States.  1996.
Campbell College Jackson Mississippi 1887
African Methodist Episcopal Headed by chartered trustees and located in the cities of Vicksburg and Friars Point, Miss. Until 1898 it remained at the two respective places as separate wings, but during the administration of Bishop W. B. Derrick, it was decided to unite these two in one institution and locate same at Jackson, MS. The founders were Revs. T. W. Stringer, W. R. Carson, L. W. W. Manaway, E. R. Carter, W. T. Anderson, W. H. Coleman, J. G. Johnson and J. W. Watson, and I. T. Montgomery, W. H. Reynolds, H. T. Risher, Granville Carter and Thomas Richardson. The school at Vicksburg was started in 1890 in Bethel Church. A large hall next to the church was built, and 1,000 acres of the best land in the Mississippi Delta were given by Collis P. Huntington. Since 1898 the following have served as presidents: M. W. Thornton, D. H. Butler, M. M. Ponton,
P. W. Howard, H. H. Buckingham, W. T. Vernon, J. L. Johnson and A. Henry Attaway, the present president. The departments are theological, collegiate, scientific, academic, normal, musical, industrial, commercial and grammar school. There were last year 230 students and 11 teachers.
There have been 3,800 students in all since 1890 and 65 graduates.
The property consists of two large brick buildings and 1,137 acres of
land, the whole valued at $50,000. (Wright) later part of Jackson
College which then became Jackson State University
www.ame-toady.com/abcsofame/higherlearning.shtml
http://docsouth.unc.edu/church/wright/wright.html
Chickasaw Female College Pontotoc Mississippi 1836 1936 Presbyterian Thomas McMackin gave the land for the use of female education. The school was incorporated as Pontotoc Female Academy; then Chickasaw College, owned and operated by the Presbyterian Church. The site is located just behind the present Pontotoc Hospital.  http://www.rootsweb.com/~mspontot/tour.htm
http://www.crl.edu/collcat/collcatC.htm
Clarke Memorial College Newton Mississippi 1908 1992 Baptist in 1981 became a division of Mississippi College http://www.clarkecollege.com/
Clinton College Clinton Mississippi


now Mississippi College http://www.mc.edu/
Corona College Corinth Mississippi 1857 1862
women's college; used as hospital 1862-1864 by Confederate and later, Union troops; burned by Union forces in 1864 http://www.corinth.net/NEW%20SITE/History/facts.htm
East Mississippi Female College Meridian Mississippi



http://www.crl.edu/content.asp?l1=5&l2=22&l3=39&top=10
Elizabeth Academy Old Washington Mississippi 1818 1843 Methodist Blandin claims, "…there is ample credible testimony that a college course of study was taught…It was the first school in Mississippi or any other State to aspire to the dignity of a college, and it was the first college for girls established by the Methodist Church."; named for Elizabeth Roach; Audubon was on faculty Blandin.  The History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Eureka College Richland Mississippi 1851
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)
Cummins, D. Duane.  The Disciples Colleges: A History.  1987.
Eureka Masonic College Holmes County Mississippi



http://www.nationalregisterofhistoricplaces.com/MS/Holmes/state.html
Franklin Female College Holly Springs Mississippi 1849


http://www.rootsweb.com/~msmarsha/locales/schools.html
Grenada College Grenada Mississippi 1882 1950 Methodist founded by Baptists as Grenada Collegiate Institute in 1851; merged with Millsaps College http://library.millsaps.edu/library/Archives/NewMeth/HistChurBackup.htm
Blandon.  History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Gulf Park Junior College Long Beach Mississippi 1919 1971
also known as Gulf Park College for Women; campus acquired for use by University of Southern Mississipi Gulf Coast campus in 1972 Elias, Louis, Jr. A History of Gulf Park College for Women, 1917-1971. Ed.D. dissertation. 1981.
Biloxi Sun Herald, January 8, 2006
http://www.usm.edu/gc/gulf-park-history.php
Harrison-Stone-Jackson Junior College Perkinston Mississippi 1912

now Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College http://www.mgccc.cc.ms.us/TCmgccc_history.htm
Hillman College Clinton Mississippi 1853 1942 Baptist women's college acquired by Mississippi College http://www.mc.edu/news_events/celebration/past.html
Blandon.  History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Hunt and Carper, eds. 
Religious Higher Education in the United States.  1996.
Industrial Institute and College of Mississippi Columbus Mississippi 1884
public The institution was created by an act of the Mississippi legislature on March 12, 1884, for the dual purposes of providing a liberal arts education and preparing women for employment. The first session began October 22, 1885, with an enrollment of approximately 250 students on a campus formerly occupied by the Columbus Female Institute, a private college founded in 1847.  The name of the institution changed to Mississippi State College for Women (MSCW) in 1920 to reflect an emphasis on collegiate rather than vocational education. The name changed again in 1974 to Mississippi University for Women (MUW) to better reflect the nature of the academic programs including graduate studies. All state colleges were designated universities at this time. The university is referred to by alumni and friends as "The W." http://www.muw.edu/misc/history.htm
Jackson College for Negro Teachers Jackson Mississippi 1877

founded as Natchez Seminary by American Baptist Home Missionary Society; became Mississippi Negro Training School in 1940 after transfer to state, Jackson College for Negro Teachers in 1944, and Jackson State College in 1956 Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.
Jefferson College Washington Mississippi 1802 1964 Episcopal first educational institution in Mississippi Territory, incorporated by General Assembly in May 1802; academy from 1805-1810, as a college from 1816-1821, then reverted to an academy; now operated  as a historic site by the state; Jefferson Military College started in 1829; files at Mississippi Dept. of Archives & History http://www.mdah.state.ms.us/hprop/hjc.html
http://www.unc.edu/depts/csas/srr7/srr7e.htm
Hunt and Carper, eds.  Religious Higher Education in the United States.  1996.
Keble College Pass Christian Mississippi
1952 Episcopal
Hunt and Carper, eds.  Religious Higher Education in the United States. 1996.
Mary Holmes College West Point Mississippi 1892 2003 Presbyterian Church (USA) initially founded in Jackson, MS as Mary Holmes Seminary to educate young women; building destroyed by fire in 1897 and was rebuilt in West Point, MS; became coeducational in 1932; trustees voted to suspend operations for fall 2003 The Chronicle of Higher Education, September 12, 2003
Meridian Female College Meridian Mississippi



http://www.crl.edu/collcat/collcatM.htm
Meridian Junior College Meridian Mississippi


later Beeson College http://library.millsaps.edu/library/Archives/NewMeth/HistChurBackup.htm
Mississippi Industrial College Holly Springs Mississippi 1905 1980's Christian Methodist Episcopal HBCU located across the street from Rust College.  Some records at Lane College in Jackson, TN.
Mississippi Normal College Hattiesburg Mississippi 1910
state supported name change to Mississippi State Teachers College in 1924; to Mississippi Southern College in 1940; to University of Southern Mississippi in 1962 Brenner, Morgan G.  The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories.  2003.
Mississippi Synodical College Holly Springs Mississippi 1882 1939
successor to Maury Institute, merged with Belhaven College; T.W.Raymond was president from 1891-1921. www.belhaven.edu/Belhaven/history.htm
http://www.rootsweb.com/~msmarsha/locales/schools.html
Mississippi Women's College Hattiesburg Mississippi 1911

see entry for South Mississippi College Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.
Mount Beulah College Edwards Mississippi



www.mustrad.org.uk/reviews/worksong.htm 
Natchez College Natchez Mississippi


institution for blacks http://30.1911encyclopedia.org/N/NA/NATCHEZ.htm
www.natchezbelle.org/adams-ind/schools.htm
Natchez Female College Natchez Mississippi


classes held at "Melmont" www.natchezbelle.org/adams-ind/schools.htm
Newton College    Woodville Mississippi 1843
Disciples of Christ
Cummins, D. Duane.  The Disciples Colleges: A History.  1987.
North Mississippi Presbyterian College Holly Springs Mississippi 1840 1866 Presbyterian
http://www.freedom2000net.com/userpages/genealogy/Alcorn/np1903.html
Burke, Colin B. American Collegiate Populations. 1982.
Oakland College Lorman Mississippi 1829 1860 Presbyterian the property was sold after the Civil War to the state and re-opened as Alcorn University; some files located at Mississippi Dept. of Archives & History http://www.alcorn.edu/history.htm
http://www.unc.edu/depts/csas/srr7/srr7e.htm
Okolona College Okolona Mississippi 1902 1965 Episcopal founded as high school and junior college for blacks http://smalltown.sarc.msstate.edu/projects/okolonatech/okolona2.html
Hunt and Carper, eds.  Religious Higher Education in the United States.  1996.
Our Lady of Snows Scholasticate Pass Christian Mississippi 1953 1971


Perkinston College Perkinston Mississippi



http://www.crl.edu/content.asp?l1=5&l2=22&l3=39&top=10
Phillips Junior College    Gulfport Mississippi
1993


Phillips Junior College of Jackson Jackson Mississippi 1973 1995


Port Gibson Female College Port Gibson Mississippi 1881 1928 Methodist Episcopal files located at Mississippi Dept. of Archives & History; beginning in 1839, Port Gibson Academy and later, Collegiate Institute http://www.unc.edu/depts/csas/srr7/srr7e.htm
http://library.millsaps.edu/library/Archives/NewMeth/HistChurBackup.htm
Blandin.  History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Presbyterian Synodical College for Young Ladies Holly Springs Mississippi 1903
Presbyterian Synod accepted donation of North Mississippi Presbyterian College
Ripley Male and Female College Ripley Mississippi



http://www.crl.edu/content.asp?l1=5&l2=22&l3=39&top=10
Rose Gates College Okolona Mississippi 1859 1862 Episcopal
Hunt and Carper, eds.  Religious Higher Education in the United States. 1996.
Saint Andrew's College Jackson Mississippi 1852 1856 Episcopal
Hunt and Carper, eds.  Religious Higher Education in the United States. 1996.
Saint Joseph's College Natchez Mississippi

Sisters of Charity
http://30.1911encyclopedia.org/N/NA/NATCHEZ.htm
www.natchezbelle.org/adams-ind/schools.htm
Saint Francis Xavier's College Vicksburg Mississippi

Roman Catholic
http://encyclopedia.jrank.org/VAN_VIR/VICKSBURG.html
Sharon Female College Sharon Mississippi 1837 1873
started as a "union" college supported by Baptists, Methodists, and Presbyterians; reorganized in 1843 as a Methodist institution; Blandin.  The History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
Shaw University Holly Springs Mississippi 1866
Methodist founded as Shaw School, became Shaw University in 1870 and then Rust University in 1882; and Rust College in 1915 Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.
Brenner, Morgan G. 
The Encyclopedia of College & University Name Histories. 2003.
Shuqualak College
Mississippi



www.jackson.k12.ms.us/schools/namesakes.htm
Soule's College Summit Mississippi



http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~pmullins/chapter15.htm
South Mississippi College Hattiesburg Mississippi 1906
Baptist became Mississippi Women's College in 1911, William Carey College in 1954 and William Carey University in 2006; in 1968 announced a merger with Mather School of Nursing in New Orleans, later relocated to New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary campus in 1998; in 1976 purchased the Gulf Coast Military Academy campus in Gulfport, now known as William Carey University on the Coast; Hunt and Carper, eds.  Religious Higher Education in the United States. 1996.
http://www.wmcarey.edu/AboutWCU/WilliamCareyUniversity/302/HistoryofWilliamCare.shtm
Southern Christian College West Point Mississippi 1909


Cummins, D. Duane.  The Disciples Colleges: A History.  1987.
Southern Christian Institute Edwards Mississippi 1874 1954 Disciples of Christ achieved junior college status around turn of the century; merged with Tougaloo College in 1954 Hunt and Carper, eds.  Religious Higher Education in the United States. 1996.
Southern Female College West Point Mississippi 1894
Cumberland Presbyterian Andrew N. Eshman became the president of Union Female College at Oxford, Mississippi, a school controlled by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church and in 1894 the school relocated to West Point and its name changed to Southern Female College. In 1905 Eshman left Mississippi and built Radnor College in Nashville. Eshman served both as president and proprietor of Radnor College until it closed in 1914.  Southern Female College changed its name to Belverino College in 1906-07, then closed a few years later. www.cumberland.org/hfcpc/schools/Evans.htm
http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/
Stanton College for Young Ladies Natchez Mississippi 1894

non-sectarian; housed in "old Fisk Mansion" http://www.crl.edu/content.asp?l1=5&l2=22&l3=39&top=10
http://30.1911encyclopedia.org/N/NA/NATCHEZ.htm
www.natchezbelle.org/adams-ind/schools.htm
Stone College Meridian Mississippi



www.jackson.k12.ms.us/schools/namesakes.htm
Stonewall College Ripley Mississippi



www.rootsweb.com/~mscivilw/reunion/CivilReunion.htm
T. J. Harris Junior College Meridian Mississippi
1970
merged with Meridian Junior College www.mcc.cc.ms.us
Utica Junior College Utica Mississippi 1903

founded as Utica Normal and Industrial Institute; fourteen years later, the Hinds County Agricultural High School was founded in Utica, and in 1922 it became Hinds Junior College; in 1958, Utica Normal and Industrial became Utica Junior College after becoming public and joining the Mississippi system of junior colleges; a 1983 merger of Hinds Junior College and the historically black Utica Junior College, as well as the inclusion of the Rankin branch, created Hinds Community College.  Townsend, Barbara. Two-Year Colleges for Women and Minorities.  1999.
Union Female College Oxford Mississippi 1853
Cumberland Presbyterian acquired property of previously established Oxford Female Academy; closed during Civil War and reopened in 1865; purchased by North Mississippi Conference of M.E. Church South in 1899 www.cumberland.org/hfcpc/mcdonold/42-49.htm
Blandin.  History of Higher Education of Women in the South.  1909.
University of Holly Springs Holly Springs Mississippi 1838 1839
opened as the Chalmers Institute in 1850 until closing in 1879 due to yellow fever epidemic; opened 1879 by Major T. S. Anderson as the Holly Springs Normal Institute http://www.rootsweb.com/~msmarsha/locales/schools.html
Westminster College Florence Mississippi 1944
Congregational Methodist Church founded as Congregational Methodist Bible School in Dallas, TX; moved to Mississippi in 1972; name changed to Wesley College after 1976; see entry for Westminster College and Bible Institute (TX) Songe, Alice H.  American Universities and Colleges: A Dictionary of Name Changes.  1978.
www.wesleycollege.com
Whitworth College Brookhaven Mississippi 1858 1976 Methodist initially a women's college and successor to Elizabeth Female Academy; claims to be 1st college in U.S. to grant degrees to women; manuscript collection at University of Southern Mississippi archives; merged with Millsaps in 1938;operated as Whitworth Bible College from 1976-1983 by several local business people; now proposed for Mississippi School of the Arts;  http://www.lib.usm.edu/~archives/whitwort.htm
www.brookhaven.com/arts/default.htm
http://library.millsaps.edu/ibrary/Archives/NewMeth/HistChurBackup.htm
Rice, Kathleen George.  A History of Whitworth College for Women.  Ph.D. dissertation. 1985.
Wood College Mathiston Mississippi 1886 2003 Methodist founded as Woodland Academy in Clarkson, Mississippi; in 1897 under the auspices of the Woman's Home Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church renamed Bennett Academy; in 1914 moved to Mathiston and in 1927 added college-level courses; operates now as Wood Institute, a conference center and retreat center The Chronicle of Higher Education, July 1, 2003
http://woodcollege.org/profile.htm







last update: 9/27/2011





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